Home Ownership Program For The Homeless in Florida

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) awarded approximately $2 billion to renew support to thousands of local homeless assistance programs across the nation.

In Florida, 249 individual agencies serving the homeless will receive an average of $336,000 each as part of the $78,683,000 coming to the state. HUD’s Continuum of Care grants provide support to 5,800 local programs nationwide. The current round is renewal funding for previously funded local programs. HUD says it will announce new project awards at a later date.

“At this time of year, thousands of local homeless assistance providers receive federal funding to operate and maintain stable housing for those living in our shelter system and on our streets,” says HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “Renewing these grants will come as a huge relief to these providers, and it will allow them to continue their work to house and serve our most vulnerable neighbors.”

HUD Continuum of Care grant funding supports a broad array of interventions designed to assist individuals and families experiencing homelessness, particularly those living in places not meant for habitation, in sheltering programs or at imminent risk of becoming homeless.

Homelessness in the U.S.

Last December, local communities reported homelessness in the U.S. remained largely unchanged in 2018. Based on these local reports, HUD’s 2018 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress found that 552,830 persons experienced homelessness on a single night in 2018, an increase of 0.3 percent since 2017.

The number of families with children experiencing homelessness declined 2.7 percent since 2017 and 29 percent since 2010. Local communities also reported a continuing trend in reducing veteran homelessness across the country – the number of veterans experiencing homelessness fell 5.4 percent since January 2017 and by 49 percent since 2010.

Florida metro homelessness grants

  • Tampa/Hillsborough County: $5,554,399 going to 10 agencies
  • St. Petersburg, Clearwater, Largo/Pinellas County: $4,002,824 going to 16 agencies
  • Lakeland, Winter Haven/Polk County: $1,599,336 going to 12 agencies
  • Deltona, Daytona Beach/Volusia, Flagler counties: $1,248,709 going to 12 agencies
  • Fort Walton Beach/Okaloosa, Walton counties : $621,070 going to 2 agencies
  • Tallahassee/Leon County: $1,338,151 going to 4 agencies
  • Orlando/Orange, Osceola, Seminole counties: $7,813,215 going to 14 agencies
  • Gainesville/Alachua, Putnam counties: $670,363 going to 7 agencies
  • Fort Pierce/St. Lucie, Indian River, Martin counties: $1,661,189 going to 16 agencies
  • Jacksonville-Duval, Clay counties: $5,012,167 going to 14 agencies
  • Pensacola/Escambia, Santa Rosa counties: $664,822 going to 4 agencies
  • St. Johns County: $121,214 going to 3 agencies
  • Palm Bay, Melbourne/Brevard County: $668,886 going to 5 agencies
  • Ocala/Marion County: $244,761 going to 5 agencies
  • Panama City/Bay, Jackson counties: $30,765 going to 1 agency
  • Hendry, Hardee, Highlands counties: $160,123 going to 2 agencies
  • Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee counties: $321,607 going to 4 agencies
  • Pasco County: $850,289 going to 7 counties
  • Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Sumter counties: $323,344 going to 4 agencies
  • Miami-Dade County: $28,725,282 going to 58 agencies
  • Fort Lauderdale/Broward County: $9,916,663 going to 20 agencies
  • Punta Gorda/Charlotte County: $200,568 going to 3 agencies
  • Monroe County: $477,526 going to 6 agencies
  • West Palm Beach/Palm Beach County: $5,630,604 going to 14 agencies
  • Naples/Collier County: $119,616 gong to 2 agencies

For more information and help in finding out if you qualify to become a proud homeowner, contact me and I will help you.

Information in it’s original form from Florida Realtors regular important news and updates I receive on a regular basis.

Information is not guaranteed over time due to Information changes without notice from the sources in this information. Please note the date of this information.


FHA 203(k) Rehab Mortgage

FHA 203(k) is a unique type of mortgage that enables home buyers to finance the purchase of a house and the cost of its rehabilitation through a single mortgage.

When buying a house that needs repair or modernizing (fixer upper), home buyers usually have to follow a complicated and costly process. The interim acquisition and improvement loans often have relatively high interest rates, short repayment terms and a balloon payment. However, the FHA 203(k) offers a solution that helps borrowers and lenders, insuring a single, long term, fixed or adjustable rate loan that covers both the acquisition and rehabilitation of a property. FHA 203(k) insured loans save borrowers time and money. They also protect the lender by allowing them to have the loan insured even before the condition and value of the property may offer adequate security.

The FHA 203(k) insures mortgages covering the purchase and rehabilitation of a home that is at least a year old. The cost of the rehabilitation must be at least $5,000, but the total value of the property must still fall within the FHA mortgage limit for the area. The value of the property is determined by either (i) the value of the property before rehabilitation plus the cost of rehabilitation, or (ii) 110 percent of the appraised value of the property after rehabilitation, whichever is less.

Lenders may charge some additional fees, such as a supplemental origination fee, fees to cover the preparation of architectural documents and review of the rehabilitation plan, and a higher appraisal fee than the regular FHA mortgage loan.

Properties Eligible for Mortgage Loan
The extent of the rehabilitation covered by FHA 203(k) insurance may range from the exceeding $5,000 in cost to virtual reconstruction. A home that has been demolished or will be razed as part of rehabilitation is eligible, for example, provided that the existing foundation system remains in place. FHA 203(k) insured loans can finance the rehabilitation of the residential portion of a property that also has non residential uses, they can also cover the conversion of a property of any size to a 1 to 4 unit property. The types of improvements that borrowers may make using FHA 203(k) financing include:

  • structural alterations and reconstruction
  • making energy conservation improvements
  • adding or replacing floors and/or floor treatments
  • enhancing accessibility for a disabled person
  • major landscape work and site improvements
  • modernization and improvements to the home’s function
  • elimination of health and safety hazards
  • changes that improve appearance and eliminate obsolescence
  • adding or replacing roofing, gutters, and downspouts
  • reconditioning or replacing plumbing; installing a well and/or septic system

HUD requires that properties financed under this program meet certain basic energy efficiency and structural standards.

Limited FHA 203(k) Mortgage

FHA’s Limited (formerly known as streamline) 203(k) program allows home buyers to finance up to $35,000 into their mortgage to repair, improve, or upgrade the property. Home buyers can quickly and easily tap into cash to pay for property repairs or improvements, such as those identified by a home inspector or an FHA appraiser. Home buyers can make their new home move in ready by remodeling the kitchen, painting the interior or purchasing new carpet.

Application:
When you are ready to apply for a loan, it will be easier for you and the lender to have these things ready.

Loan Checklist:

    • Address to your place of residence (past two years)
    • Social Security numbers
    • Names and location of your employers (past two years)
    • Gross monthly salary at your current job(s)
    • Pertinent information for all checking and savings accounts
    • Pertinent information for all open loans
    • Complete information for other real estate you own
    • Approximate value of all personal property
    • Certificate of Eligibility and DD-214 (for veterans only)
  • Current check stubs and your W-2 forms (past two years)
  • Personal tax returns (past two years), current income statement and business balance sheet for self-employed individuals
DISCLAIMER: We do not endorse any website that you click on, on our website. We want you to be fully informed of the process so that you can make an informed decision on what is right for you.

Information is not guaranteed over time due to Information changes without notice from the sources in this information. Please note the date of this information.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save